Saturday, January 12, 2013

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Semi-Random Research

Randy's suggestions for this week's entertainment are:
1)  We're going to do a little bit of Semi-Random Research tonight...

2)  Go to your family tree database of choice (you know, like RootsMagic, Reunion, Ancestry Member Tree), and determine who the very last person on your list of names is.

3)  What do you know about this person based on your research?  It's OK to do more if you need to - in fact, it's encouraged!

4)  How are you related to this person, and why is s/he in your family tree?

5)  Tell us about it in a blog post of your own, in a comment to this blogpost, or in a Facebook Status post or Google+ Stream post.

The last person on my name list is Mary Zotnorn who is person number 928 in my data base of 3132 individuals.  Mary was born about 1858 in Bohemia and her mother's name was Katharina.  That is all I knew about Mary except that she was one of my son-in-law's Great-great-grandmothers.  Since doing a little more research on her at ancestry.com today, I know a lot more about her.  Mary Kotorour (not Zotnorn) was born 26 May 1860 to Frantisek Kotorour and Katarina Kubat.  She married Jan (John F) Bozovsky 2 Sep 1877 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois.
In the 1900 census she is listed with husband John and children John, Mary, Rose, and Antonia.  Mary and John's daughter Rose married Frank Krbec in Chicago on 25 April 1904.  Rose and Frank had a son Frank Valentine who married Anna Angeline Franke Mann and in turn had a son John who with his wife Pamela Coan adopted Scott Allen.   Her widowed mother Katrina was also living in the household at the time of the 1900 census.  Mary died in Chicago on 18 Feb 1911 and is buried in St Adelbert's Cemetery.  I'm sure there is more to be found and corrected.

Mary is in my tree because my son-in-law is adopted and we are tracing his adoptive parents trees for the grandchildren.  Actually the grandchildren have visited the little village in the Czech Republic that their Krbec ancestors came from.